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Empty shelves threaten in Great Britain due to sudden CO2 shortage | Abroad

British frozen and meat shelves are in danger of becoming empty due to a shortage of CO2. Manufacturers warn that they will no longer be able to supply food items to supermarkets and restaurants within days.




The notable cause of the food crisis lies in the closure of two fertilizer plants in Great Britain. These factories produced CO2 as a by-product, which was supplied to the food industry. Slaughterhouses need CO2 to stun animals. CO2 is also used for making dry ice and vacuum packaging food products.

The sudden shortage of CO2 threatens the production of frozen and meat products. The British food sector is sounding the alarm and urging the government to take action. A spokesperson for the meat industry expects that within two weeks there will no longer be enough CO2 available to slaughter pigs, which means that animals will have to be kept longer on the farm – with potentially major consequences for animal welfare.

‘Christmas cancelled’

It is also questionable whether the British can serve their beloved turkey at Christmas. With less than a hundred days until Christmas, turkey meat production is in full swing at the moment. But: “Without CO2, Christmas will be canceled this year,” said the owner of the largest British poultry producer.

The online supermarket Ocado has already announced that it will no longer be able to supply frozen products. The production of beer and soft drinks is also at risk due to the lack of carbon dioxide.

A government spokesman said he was closely monitoring the situation and was in close contact with the food industry.

The British food sector has been in dire straits for some time, partly because many European workers left after Brexit. As a result, the industry is faced with major staff shortages. In addition, the coronavirus means that employees have to be quarantined regularly.

Empty shelves threaten in Great Britain due to sudden CO2 shortage | Abroad
Source link Empty shelves threaten in Great Britain due to sudden CO2 shortage | Abroad

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