Netherlands

General practitioners and GGD want better information about fever in children

Photo: ANP

Amsterdam general practitioners, together with the GGD, will offer 20,000 information booklets with information about fever in young children. That should help to alleviate the “sky-high pressure” on general practitioner care, they say.

The booklet explains, among other things, what a fever is and when parents should or should not contact the general practitioner or out-of-hours GP. “Fever in children is usually harmless, but often a reason to contact the GP practice or post,” says Katinka Prince, chair of the Amsterdam General Practitioners Alliance.

With the rising corona figures, an expected baby boom and the flu season, healthcare providers see the pressure on general practitioner care only increasing. “If parents have more knowledge, this saves questions for the GP and we have more time for the important questions for help,” Prince says about the information campaign.

According to the Amsterdam health care providers, children up to the age of four visit the GP most often and parents of small children call “relatively often” for a telephone consultation. “Of course, parents can always call in case of alarm symptoms or concerns,” Prince emphasizes.

The GGD Amsterdam-Amstelland distributes the ‘fever booklets’ during baby consultations via youth doctors and nurses, for example during the first vaccination. A possible side effect of the injection against dysentery, whooping cough and tetanus is a possible side effect, say the general practitioners and the GGD. 260 GPs from the capital can offer the information booklets at the GP post or in the practice. The fever information can also be found online.



General practitioners and GGD want better information about fever in children
Source link General practitioners and GGD want better information about fever in children

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