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Jaguar E-Pace P300e test: ‘baby SUV’ is now grown | Car

CAR TESTThree years after its introduction, Jaguar has improved its compact SUV called E-Pace. The hybrid powertrain of the new P300e is very welcome and actually makes the other versions redundant.




Jaguar E-Pace P300e (309 hp/227 kW), from €62,303

When the E-Pace made its debut in 2018, there was another Jaguar SUV that commanded all the attention. After all, the all-electric I-Pace was a true revolution for the brand, while the E-Pace was irreverently ‘just’ the first compact SUV in Jaguar’s history. It’s barely been in the spotlight since then, but the recent revamp makes it more interesting than ever.

Recently, the E-Pace is also available as a P300e. The P stands for ‘petrol’ (petrol), the number 300 shows the engine power and the small letter e reveals that it is partly electric. The 1.5-litre three-cylinder petrol engine and electric motor form a pleasant powertrain: smooth, smooth and quiet, even when the fuel engine is working alone.

Jaguar claims an electric driving range of 63 kilometers on a fully charged battery pack, but the test car did not reach that. Also because the fuel engine sometimes remained active for unclear reasons. A test consumption of 1:16.9 is therefore not very impressive, although the consumption drops enormously as long as you drive many short pieces on the electric motor. Thanks to the lower bpm tax, the (on paper) low emissions also make the P300e much more affordable than other variants with this engine power. Although the E-Pace is anything but a bargain even as a hybrid.

Since the last update, the E-Pace has clearly matured. The materials in the (albeit slightly dated-looking) interior are much nicer, the operation of the multimedia system is more effective and the chassis is very nicely balanced. On a cobblestone road, the Jaguar behaves sovereignly, while holding up strong in fast corners. You are also well behind the wheel. The downside of the smallest Jaguar SUV: the space for luggage, small items and any rear passengers is not enough.

© Bart Hoogveld

Plus
+ Smooth drivetrain.
+ Comfortable and sleek handling.
+ Good infotainment.
+ Excellent driving position.

min
– Electric range.
– Limited seating space in the back.
– Relatively expensive.
– Luggage space is not enough.

Conclusion
The E-Pace drives more pleasantly and is more mature than ever. The P300e offers theoretically low (operating) costs, but the competition is often cheaper and more spacious than this cub of the Jaguar family.

Additional test notes

The fact that Jaguar provides the P300e with a fuel engine with ‘only’ three cylinders can raise eyebrows. These engines are, in a way, known for their noisy nature and vibration. But in practice, this choice works out well in the E-Pace, because the 1.5-litre Ingenium engine does not make itself heard too much and there is actually no question of irritating vibrations. Jaguar has clearly paid a lot of attention to this and the brand has done well.

The same applies to the silence and tranquility in the chassis. That is at a high level. Since the recent refurbishment, there are other rubbers in the suspension of the E-Pace, among other things, which should prevent rattling. The result is impressive, because the Jaguar knows how to keep annoying influences away from the occupants, especially on bad road surfaces. The suspension comfort is also at a high level and that is great, especially when you consider that the E-Pace in corners does not feel like a slack mop. well done, jaguar.

The three-cylinder engine also clearly benefits from the presence of the large electric motor on the rear axle. This produces a considerable power of 80 kilowatts (108 hp), so that the fuel engine has to work much less hard. Partly because of this, the standard eight-speed automatic gearbox does not need much action: a kick down is hardly necessary, for example, because so much power and flexibility is available. Together, the two engines offer E-Pace four-wheel drive and excellent performance: the sprint from 0 to 100 kilometers per hour takes about 6.5 seconds, according to the factory, while the top speed is 216 kilometers per hour.

Bart Hoogveld
© Bart Hoogveld

The battery pack of the P300e measures 15 kilowatt hours: according to Jaguar that should be good for 63 kilometers of electric driving range, but to achieve that you have to operate the accelerator pedal as if you were walking on eggshells. On the highway, the remaining range melts like snow in the sun: after a ride of about 35 kilometers at 106 kilometers per hour, the battery is as good as empty.

It is all the more striking that Jaguar has equipped the P300e with a CCS connection in the charging port. Thanks to this Combined Charging System, you can use a fast charger. Then the plug-in hybrid E-Pace charges with a maximum of 50 kilowatts, so that the batteries should be almost full again in just over fifteen minutes. Such a facility is eminently useful for long journeys, but if you take the trouble of a charging stop in this Jaguar you should (broadly speaking) stop about every 50 kilometers to be able to cover your journey electrically as much as possible. In practice, most people are more likely to continue long journeys on their fuel engine, we expect. It deserves applause that Jaguar has built in a relatively expensive and advanced CCS connection, but the question is how much and how often drivers of an E-Pace will use it.

The E-Pace is also available with diesel and petrol engines without significant electrical assistance. The price list for the diesels starts at 62,998 euros for the 163 hp (120 kW) D165 and ends at 74,008 euros for the D400, which delivers 204 horsepower (150 kilowatts).

In terms of petrol, the P160 is the cheapest E-Pace with prices starting at 61,916 euros. It has a 1.5-liter three-cylinder with mild hybrid technology and 160 hp (118 kW), while the P250 (184 kW/249 hp) carries a 2.0 liter four-cylinder in its nose. Due to its considerably higher CO2 emissions of an average of 202 grams per kilometer, the prices of this mild hybrid top version start at more than 80,053 euros. The P300e plug-in hybrid emits 44 grams per kilometer on paper: it is cleaner, faster and considerably cheaper.

The cheapest P300e is the R Dynamic, which includes painted side skirts and a different decoration in the grille and bumpers. Then you can choose from the S, the SE or the HSE. In addition to the size of the alloy wheels (starting at 18-inch), the more expensive versions distinguish themselves with, among other things, a panoramic glass roof, an electrically operated tailgate, leather upholstery and a better audio system.

Bart Hoogveld
© Bart Hoogveld

Charming is the way Jaguar has put effort into fun details in and on the E-Pace. For example, the brand’s logo – the ‘leaper’, an athletically jumping jaguar – can be seen on the sheet metal, the seat upholstery and the steering wheel. Above the controls for the climate control it can be read that Jaguar was founded in 1935 in Coventry, England, the plastic mat in the center console shows a subtle leopard print, a cub (the E-Pace) is walking in the black edges of the windscreen. behind mother Jaguar and in the dark the lights under the door mirrors project a similar scene onto the road surface. It doesn’t make the car so much better, but these kinds of details give your E-Pace just that little bit of extra flair.

Bart Hoogveld
© Bart Hoogveld

How does the Jaguar E-Pace P300e compare to the Audi Q3 Sportback? View the AutoWeek double test here.

Bart Hoogveld
© Bart Hoogveld

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© Bart Hoogveld

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© Bart Hoogveld

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© Bart Hoogveld

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© Bart Hoogveld

You will find all previously published tests in our extensive Autotest file.


Jaguar E-Pace P300e test: ‘baby SUV’ is now grown | Car
Source link Jaguar E-Pace P300e test: ‘baby SUV’ is now grown | Car

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