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New Dutch bicycle must become the alternative to the car: top speed 50 km/h | Car

The trendy VanMoof e-bikes are flying out of the store and the founders, brothers Taco and Ties Carlier, make their entrance into the Quote 500. The Dutch bicycle brand is doing fast, but it can go even faster. Literal. Today, the company unveiled its latest ‘hyperbike’: an electric bicycle that goes 50 kilometers per hour. It is intended as the alternative to the car in and around the city.




The e-bike has a strong tailwind. Half of all bicycles sold in the Netherlands are now electric. The majority of these are normal e-bikes, which are allowed 25 kilometers per hour, a small part is formed by the so-called speed pedelec with a higher speed (pedal assistance up to 45 kilometers per hour) and stricter conditions, such as the obligation of a helmet and a yellow license plate.

The Dutch bicycle brand VanMoof thinks it is best to go a bit further, and today announced a new model and a new category at the same time. According to the makers, the VanMoof V (the V refers to velocity) is a ‘hyperbike’ that can easily go fifty kilometers per hour.

The minimalist frame and typical VanMoof jokes such as the turbo boost button for that extra boost and the built-in lock have been retained. New features include two-wheel drive with a front and rear motor, extra thick tires and front and rear suspension. The estimated price tag is about one and a half times higher than the existing models: 3500 euros. If you want to be one of the first in the world to climb on the saddle of this hyperbike, you will have to be patient. The first delivery is expected at the end of 2022.

Revolutionizing Mobility

The idea behind this faster e-bike is to revolutionize urban mobility. The predecessors are emphatically city bikes, where the hyperbike also proves its usefulness outside the city limits, for example in commuting. The VanMoof V wants to be a so-called disruptive product, say a troublemaker for the established order. The intention is that this super bike will reduce car use and force cities to give priority to cyclists in the infrastructure.

VanMoof CEO Ties Carlier, from Taiwan where he oversees production nine months a year: “Governments have long regarded the e-bike as a potential danger, but now the realization is emerging that it offers an enormous opportunity to make the city more sustainable and more liveable. to make. Significant progress is being made internationally in terms of cycling infrastructure. In countries where there was not much before, lanes are now being built that are wide enough for two streams of speeds, for regular bicycles and e-bikes. The Dutch have traditionally been proud of the good cycling facilities, but in Amsterdam you also see the law of the braking lead act when it becomes too busy on narrow cycle paths. They need to be upgraded.”

Regulations need to be changed

In addition to the bicycle paths, something else still needs to be done: the regulations. Perhaps not in the US, after Germany and the Netherlands, the largest market for VanMoof, because there are few restrictions there. Not even in Japan, where the VanMoof V will soon be allowed onto the public road straight out of the showroom. But in the Netherlands? Absolutely, there it is. Like a moving Trojan horse, the hyperbike has to break open the current restrictions, for example by using smart technology. “Geofencing (whereby the GPS position is read – ed.) makes it possible to allow a higher speed if the bicycle is outside built-up areas, and to limit it to, for example, 25 kilometers per hour within built-up areas. . Cyclists want more freedom. You can go 180 kilometers per hour in an Opel Corsa, but you don’t do that in built-up areas either.”

Exploratory talks have already started with the municipality of Amsterdam, which according to Carlier is a contender to have the scoop as the first city where the hyperbike is driving. VanMoof opts for the local route instead of the national or European level, because municipalities can operate faster by allowing exceptions to existing regulations. Carlier: ,,I’m sure it will work, if only because everyone wants it. Cyclists want to go faster where possible, governments want to reduce car use. If all parties benefit from it – with the exception of car manufacturers – then it should just work out.

“We have to get moving for that. Our goal is to get as many people on board as possible, because together we have more clout. That is why we announce the product well in advance, a bit like Tesla with the Cybertruck. And we deliberately opt for a low reservation fee of twenty euros, an amount that will be refunded if you ultimately cancel the purchase.”

VanMoof V © VanMoof

VanMoof V
VanMoof V © VanMoof

VanMoof V
VanMoof V © VanMoof

VanMoof V
VanMoof V © VanMoof

VanMoof V
VanMoof V © VanMoof

VanMoof V
VanMoof V © VanMoof

VanMoof V
VanMoof V © VanMoof

VanMoof V
VanMoof V © VanMoof

Taco and Ties Carlier, the enterprising brothers of bicycle manufacturer VanMoof.
Taco and Ties Carlier, the enterprising brothers of bicycle manufacturer VanMoof. © VanMoof


New Dutch bicycle must become the alternative to the car: top speed 50 km/h | Car
Source link New Dutch bicycle must become the alternative to the car: top speed 50 km/h | Car

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