Netherlands

Sending asylum seekers back to the EU country of arrival usually does not work

Over the past seven years, the Dutch government has failed to return asylum seekers to the EU country where the first application was made in three quarters of the cases. De Telegraaf reports this on the basis of figures from the Ministry of Justice and Security.

EU rules state that the country where people first arrive in the EU is responsible for the asylum procedure. Under the so-called Dublin Agreement, countries are allowed to send asylum seekers back to the country of entry. This is to prevent asylum seekers from continuing to try in different countries.

In the past seven years, 46,000 asylum seekers in the Netherlands have not been returned, while they should have been under the Dublin Agreement. In the same period, fewer than 14,000 people have succeeded in evicting people. The main reasons why it does not work are that asylum seekers leave or that the country they have to go to does not take them back. The corona pandemic also hinders deportation, the ministry says.

A spokesperson for the ministry tells the newspaper that “on the basis of the figures it cannot simply be concluded to which country transfers are going well and to which country less”.

Sending asylum seekers back to the EU country of arrival usually does not work
Source link Sending asylum seekers back to the EU country of arrival usually does not work

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