Netherlands

Voters with a non-Western background feel poorly represented in the Chamber

Dutch voters with a non-Western background do not feel well represented in the House of Representatives. This is apparent from the National Voter Survey, in which extra attention was paid to this group for the first time. They make up more than ten percent of the electorate, but they have never been scrutinized so extensively before.

There are several reasons why voters with a non-Western background feel poorly represented. Nearly 73 percent believe that the interests of this group are not being looked after enough. There are also too few MPs with a migration background, according to more than three quarters.

Discrimination

That feeling of inadequate representation appears to be even more prevalent among voters who experience discrimination. Of the voters with a non-Western background, 42 percent indicate that they experience discrimination (very) often. This percentage is even higher among Dutch people with a Surinamese or African background and the second generation.

Perceived discrimination is an expression of dissatisfaction, says researcher Marcel Lubbers. “What we often see is that people who are dissatisfied drop out of politics.” Yet discriminated voters do not turn their backs on politics, the study concludes. “If people experience discrimination, it leads them to vote anyway.”

Political preference

Where Dutch people with a migration background used to vote mainly for the PvdA, this is changing with the emergence of parties that are explicitly committed to this group. For example, Denk scores well among Moroccan and Turkish Dutch people, Bij1 among Surinamese and African Dutch, and Asian Dutch vote more often for right-wing parties.

In Europe, the Netherlands is leading the way in the emergence of such parties, says Lubbers. It is relatively easy for new political parties to enter parliament. “Whether the arrival of parties such as Denk and Bij1 removes or strengthens the feeling of poor representation remains to be seen now that they are both in parliament.”

Voters with a non-Western background feel poorly represented in the Chamber
Source link Voters with a non-Western background feel poorly represented in the Chamber

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